Chest and Upper Back Pain Which Muscle is to Blame?

Chest Pain

When you have chest and upper back pain, it can be hard to figure out where it's coming from. However, when you take the time to check out all of your symptoms and determine what they are coming from, you will be much better able to understand what is going on. Sometimes, it's hard to discern this particular type of pain from other issues just because it is so similar. However, there are many cases when people will tend to minimize this pain and try to blame it solely on their backs instead of actually addressing other problems. Anyone who experiences chest and upper back pain has two choices: either they have pulled or strained a muscle in their upper back, or they have some other condition or ailment that needs to be tended to by a medical professional.

Sometimes it's hard to determine when to see a doctor and when to just wait it out. Here's a good rule of thumb, though. If you aren't having any other symptoms except for chest and upper back pain, they you will probably be able to wait it out because it's just a pulled muscle. However, if you have any other symptoms or ailments along with the back pain and/or chest pain, you will want to get yourself to a doctor quickly to ensure that you're not having a heart attack or another serious issue that could cause permanent injury or death. Ultimately, the goal is to attempt to remain calm and determine how the situation looks before overreacting, but at the same time being safe and getting professional help when you need it because you can never be too careful.

Chest and upper back pain are common among people who pull muscles in their back and shoulders. This type of pain generally stems from twisting, lifting, bending, or moving the wrong way, which in turn agitates or strains the muscles of the back when they're not used to being moved a certain way. If you have done some sort of strenuous activity that you can blame the back pain on directly, you can give it a little time to figure out if it is going to subside. However, if you have no reason to have pain in your upper back and chest that you are aware of, or if the pain gets worse, you want to get medical attention as soon as you can.

There are many different treatments for chest and upper back pain, but since it usually results from pulled or strained muscles, there isn't much that does better than rest and time. You can use heat to relax the muscles and ice to reduce any swelling, and just rest for a day or two until the pain subsides. If necessary, you can use over the counter medications to help relieve the pain when it is mild to moderate. If you have severe, chronic, or continuing pain, you definitely need to see a doctor or consider physical therapy or prescription pain medication to alleviate your pain. Usually, when the pain is in the upper back and chest, you can relieve it without serious therapy, medication, or surgery. Lower back pain is the one that generally presents with more serious complications or more intensive treatments, while upper back and chest pain is generally less serious and goes away often on its own with time.

Chest and upper back pain generally go hand in hand for most people who experience a muscle problem or ache in their upper back. This pain can often be accompanied by muscle spasms and shooting pains, so you should be aware of everything that is going on. Generally, there is a strained or pulled muscle in the upper back or a shoulder that is causing this particular pain. If you do choose to seek medical attention, you need to let your doctor know about all the symptoms that you are experiencing so that you can receive the proper treatment. In many cases, you'll be able to get away with rest and OTC pain medication, but you should never minimize the pain that you experience just because you don't want to go to the doctor. Keep these things in mind, and you should be better able to handle upper back and chest pain.